Wythenshawe cancer charity set to help more families after centre’s £338m facelift

Macmillan Cancer Research Centre in Wythenshawe is undergoing a major extension to support more people whose lives are blighted by the disease.

The centre is based in the grounds of Wythenshawe Hospital and is a vital service to individuals and their families who are living with cancer.

The new-look centre in the grounds of Wythenshawe Hospital  will provide a much larger activity space and an additional therapy/meeting room, when the £338million refurbishment is complete.

The Macmillan team will be able to offer more counselling, complementary therapies, cancer survivorship programmes and benefits and financial advice sessions.

Debbie Smith, Macmillan Cancer Information and Support Centre Manager at Wythenshawe Hospital, said:” This investment is a fantastic opportunity to expand the centre and, more importantly, help us enhance the service we provide to meet the needs, not just physical and clinical, but also financial, emotional and psychological, of even more people affected by cancer in South Manchester.”

In 2017 the centre supported nearly 27,000 people in various ways from supplying leaflets, CDs, books, activity support groups and counselling.  They also provided over 800 grants totaling to £178K, helping with heating and travel costs, clothing, new appliances for people living with cancer.

The charity urgently need schools, community groups and businesses to organise a fundraising event to help support this vital service for local people living with cancer.

For more information and fundraising ideas or to make a donation please contact cjenkinson@macmillan.org.uk. 

And anyone requiring  support from the centre can call the team on 0161 291 4876.


REVIEW: Dad’s Army @ Northenden Methodist Church

When a legendary classic comedy like Dad’s Army is brought to the stage a by an amateur theatre fans of the show can’t help being a little apprehensive.

But DON’T PANIC – this production by the Northenden Players is a superb recreation of the 1970s sitcom featuring the hapless misadventures of the Walmington-on-Sea home guard platoon in their efforts to defend the nation from the heel of the Nazi jackboot.

This is a very ambitious show and you have to salute the bravery of anyone who would attempt a homage to a comedy institution still shown on TV today.

But thanks to a strong cast and effective use of sets which enables swift scene changes, the Players pull it off admirably.

Everyone contributes to the success of the show, but at the centre of it all is an uncannily accurate portrayal of the pompous but heroic Captain Mainwaring.

Bill Platt just is Mainwaring and it is no exaggeration to say his performance is probably the closest thing you’ll to the brilliant Arthur Lowe’s rendition on TV.

The production comprises three classic episodes – The Deadly Attachment, featuring one of the most repeated lines in comedy history; Mum’s Army; and The Godiva Affair – rounded off with an hilarious attempt by the platoon at rendition of The Floral Dance.

The cast work well together to serve up a comedy treat and will not disappoint fans of the programme. The interplay between Mainwaring and his posh effete Sergeant Wilson, played by Peter Bowers is wonderful.

And Cyril Walker and David Hunt delight in the roles of doddery veteran Lance Cpl Jones and dour Scotland Private Frazer.

It is a hoot from start to finish and a great night out.

Runs till Saturday Feb 17.

REVIEW: Strangers on a Train @ The Opera House, Manchester

strangers-on-a-train-theatre-royal-glasgow-1It was always going to be a big ask to bring Patricia Highsmith’s tense psychological thriller to the stage and this production doesn’t quite pull it off in the way that Alfred Hitchcock famously did on the silver screen.

There is much of merit in the show, with some effective mood lighting and innovative use of sets, but the pace and direction lets it down and it is certainly a play of two halves.

The story is based around the consequences of a chance meeting on a train between  Guy Haines, an ambitious architect and alcoholic wreck, Charles Bruno. In a drink-fuelled stupour, Bruno comes up with  a hypothetical plan, where he would to murder the wife Haines is about to divorce in exchange for Haines killing Bruno’s father.  When Bruno unexpectedly keeps to his side of the bargain, pressure is applied for Haines to deliver, thus providing the main premise for the drama.

But prior to the interval, the dramatic action is laboured, slow and frankly quite boring.  When you don’t care that much about the fate of the characters, you know something is wrong. However, maybe some-one had a work in the break, because the pace picked up in the second half culminating in the dramatic conclusion at the end.

Chris Harper as Bruno and Jack Ashton as Haines deliver reasonable performances although there are one or two instances of the audience perhaps laughing when they shouldn’t as Bruno becomes increasingly psychotic.

Overall, not a terrible night at the theatre, but one that is distinctly underwhelming.

Runs till February 10



Transport bosses make funding bid to expand Airport Metro line

Pic: Mikey

Transport for Greater Manchester has submitted a funding bid to the Department for Transport to extend the Metrolink’s Airport line.

The Airport line currently terminates at Manchester Airport’s railway station, but the funding bid outlines the potential to extend the line with an additional stop at Terminal 2.

According to a report in The Place North West, TfGM said the expansion would “align with Manchester Airport Group’s intended expansion to Terminal 2 and the future development of Airport City”.

TfGM will also look into extending the Metrolink from Terminal 2 to the proposed HS2 station at the airport, which forms part of the wider “Western Loop” initiative, which could potentially link the HS2 station at the airport to Wythenshawe Hospital and the surrounding area.

Other options to make the airport a transport hub for the area include proposals for a busway and cycleway linking Altrincham with the airport’s HS2 station; additional bus priority lanes on the existing road network; and an extension of the railway station’s platforms to increase capacity.


Horrors of the Holocaust shared with Wythenshawe pupils

IMG_7069 - CopyA group of students from Saint Paul’s Catholic High School in Wythenshawe, Greater Manchester took part in a special event at the Home in Manchester to mark Holocaust Memorial Day.

Holocaust Memorial Day is the international day of remembrance for the victims and the survivors of the Holocaust and other genocides. Each year there is a national theme, set by the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, which provides a focus to the event; this year’s theme is the power of words.  Read More…


Air ambulance called to Northenden college after student falls from balcony

Police have begun an investigation after a student fell from a third floor balcony at Manchester College in Northenden today.

Emergency services have been called to the Sale Road, campus at around 4pm today, police said.

The Manchester Evening News has been reporting from the scene.


Art and dance “Illuminates” Wythenshawe Library

Illuminate Dancers Between Bookshelves LoDance, and music  will combine to create a visually stunning piece art as the acclaimed Illuminate comes to Wythenshawe Library on Friday. 

Following much-praised performances by Company Chameleon at Manchester Central Library in November, there will be special performances at three libraries this week.

The performance, on Friday Feb 2 is free, but booking is essential, bringing cutting-edge, contemporary dance to the heart of local communities, providing an extraordinary experience between the bookshelves and showcasing just what exciting and creative​ ​spaces libraries can be. Read More…

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